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New article

New article in "Scientific Reports"

The amphibian olfactory receptor gene family of trace amine associated receptors, in short TAARs, is exceedingly small and allows a comprehensive analysis of spatial expression patterns, as well as a comparison with neuronal responses to the expected ligands for this receptor family, amines.
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New article

New article in "Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience"

Sulfated steroids activate both the vomernasal and the main olfactory system of Xenopus laevis. The sensitive olfactory neurons are also activated by tank water, suggesting that sulfated steroids are excreted by tadpoles and frogs.
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New article

New article in "The Journal of Comparative Neurology"

The amphibian olfactory system undergoes massive remodeling during metamorphosis. The transition from aquatic olfaction in larvae to semi-aquatic or airborne olfaction in adults requires anatomical, cellular and molecular modifications. Here we performed a stage by stage investigation of the anatomical changes of the Xenopus olfactory organ during metamorphosis.
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New article

New article in "The Journal of Experimental Biology"

Complete segregation of the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) and the vomeronasal epithelium is first observed in amphibians. We examined the localization of TRPC2 in an aquatic amphibian and cloned the Xenopus laevis trpc2 gene. We show that it is expressed in both the MOE and the vomeronasal epithelium. This is the first description of a broad trpc2 expression in the MOE of a tetrapod.
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New article

New article in "PLoS ONE"

We have recently shown that amino acid responses in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) of larval Xenopus laevis segregate into a lateral and a medial processing stream, and that the former is part of a vomeronasal type 2 receptor expression zone in the MOE. We hypothesized that the lateral amino acid responses might be mediated via a vomeronasal-like transduction machinery. Here we report that amino acid-responsive receptor neurons in the lateral MOE employ a phospholipase C (PLC) and diacylglycerol-mediated transduction cascade that is independent of Ca2+ store depletion.
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